pet safety

  • Fall Safety Tips for You and Your Dog!

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    Fall can be one of the most beautiful times of the year! With the colors changing, the school season beginning and the weather cooling off, it’s definitely one of our favorites. However, did you know that fall does present some possible dangers for our pets? We’ve compiled some tips to keep you and your dog safe and happy as we happily welcome autumn.

    Keep school supplies away

    For pet owning households with children in school, fall means stocking up on school supplies like markers, glue sticks, pencils and erasers. While most kid-friendly school supplies do not pose any toxic risks- it’s important to keep them out of your pet’s reach. If ingested, supplies pose choking hazards as well as risks of dangerous gastrointestinal blockages.

    Ease into outdoor activity if needed

    In some areas of the United States, it’s simply too hot in the summer to take your dog for runs or to endure outdoor activities for long periods of time. Now that the weather is cooler and you and your dog can enjoy more time together outside!  Keep in mind that dogs, just like humans, can become out of shape and may require some initial training to get their bodies back into outdoor hiking and running shape.

    Be weary of rodent traps and poisons

    Autumn is generally a popular time for rodents to seek shelter in human homes, forcing many homeowners to use poisons and traps. If you must use these products, keep them as inaccessible as possible from your pets as they could cause serious physical and medical harm.

    Watch out for snakes!

    According to the ASPCA, autumn is the season when snakes who are preparing for hibernation may be particularly “grumpy,” increasing the possibility of severe bites to those unlucky pups who find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time. Pet owners should know what kinds of venomous snakes may be in their environment—and where these snakes are most likely to be found—so they can keep pets out of those areas.

    We hope these quick tips were helpful for you and your pet and wish everyone a happy and SAFE fall!

  • It’s a Smoky Situation…

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    While we usually speak on the dangers and possible pet anxiety-triggers caused by summer storms, it’s important to be aware that forest fires can also bring stress to your pet. Lately, many of the areas in west coast region have been in flames due to forest and brush fires, and it’s not just the flames that are destructive- fire smoke can travel hundreds of miles, affecting the air quality throughout a whole region and forcing our pets to stay inside.

    For pets that are accustomed to consistent time outside, posting up indoors may spur on added anxiety or destructive behavior. To combat this, we suggest our ThunderShirt, ThunderToy and ThunderTreat to help calm your pet and keep them occupied as the smoke clears. While short trips to answer nature’s call are inevitable, keep in mind that heavy smoke can take a toll on our pet’s respiratory systems just as it can on ours. Additionally, if your home is in danger of a fire and you are forced to evacuate, the hustle and bustle of packing your things can spark anxious behavior in your dog. Consider using ThunderShirt when packing and to take with you to a safe location to help your dog stay calm and relaxed.

    Live in an area prone to forest fires? Here’s some safety tips for you and your furry friends!

    If your area’s air quality is labeled “unhealthy”

    • Shelter in place, stay indoors.
    •  Keep you and your pet hydrated to progress a cough and help prevent smoky air from settling in the lungs
    •  Use air conditioning if possible, to help filter air throughout a house
    •  Keep all doors and windows shut in both home and vehicles, if in a vehicle make sure the air conditioner is set to reticulate the air
    •  Humidifiers will help the air quality in a home or building

    If You Are Forced to Evacuate

    Plan ahead for a safe place for your pet
    Evacuation shelters generally don’t accept pets and for this reason it’s important to plan ahead to ensure that your pets and family will have a safe place to stay. Research hotels and motels outside your immediate area for pet policies and ask friends and relatives outside the area if you and your pets can stay with them in case of a disaster.

    Proper Identification and Updated Vaccinations
    Having your pet licensed AND microchipped can protect your pet and help identify them if they were to become lost. Also, keep your pet’s vaccinations current, and keep the records handy.

    Leave early and take your pet
    One of the most important things to do if you are evacuating your home is to take your pets with you because you may be forced to stay away longer than anticipated. In addition, leave early and don’t wait for mandatory evacuation orders because if emergency officials have to evacuate you, you might be told to leave your pets behind.

    If you are away
    The risk of a fire may strike when you’re away from home. Make arrangements in advance with a trusted neighbor (who is comfortable with your pets and knows where in the home they are likely to be) to take them and meet you at a specified location.

    Picture perfect
    Have a photograph taken of you with your pets to show proof of ownership should you become separated.

    Pet carriers 
    Have pet carriers ready that are the correct sizes for each of your pets. Make sure each carrier is labeled with your contact information, should you become separated from your pet.

    Prepare an emergency kit
    Have a pet emergency kit prepared and ready for a disaster like a forest fire. This kit should have:

    • Three-plus days supply food and food bowls, water and two weeks of your pet’s medications
    • A ThunderShirt
    • Litter boxes with litter, if you have cats
    • Extra leashes and collars
    • Vaccination and medical records
    • Photos and descriptions of each pet
    • Pet first aid kit and pet first aid book

    Emergency numbers:
    If you have to evacuate at the last minute and cannot take your pets, don’t be a hero and return to the danger zone to try to rescue them.  Contact a trained professional rescue team, such as your local animal humane society.

    (tips adapted via)

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