Thundershirt For Cats

  • What’s making your cat anxious?

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    So, maybe you’ve noticed your cat’s behavior has changed or they are acting out. This could be a sign of anxiety, which occurs more frequently in cats than we may think. Here is a brief outline of what some common symptoms and causes of anxiety are and what you can to treat them.

    The symptoms.

    While with any animal the symptoms of anxiety will vary. Here are some of the most common:

    • Spraying (even in neuters)
    • Inappropriate elimination
    • Pacing back and forth at perimeters of fences
    • Loss of appetite
    • Pulling out of fur
    • Trembling
    • Excessive meowing
    • Hiding from the world, under beds, behind curtains etc.
    • Physical symptoms and illness – some illnesses and disorders (such as acne) have been associated with stress. Stress can also be a response to physical illness, so it is most important to check with your vet to rule out a medical condition

    If you are noticing these symptoms in your cat, it may be a result of one of the following:

    • Overcrowding in multi-cat households
    • Moving
    • Travel
    • New family member (human or animal)
    • Parties/visitors
    • Medical conditions/injury
    • Confinement
    • New cat in the neighborhood
    • Change of any kind

    Cats differ in their responses to stress. Some may take on major changes without any signs or symptoms, while others may fall apart at the slightest change. To treat anxious cats, we first recommend talking to your veterinarian. In addition to conditioning your cat to become more used to their surroundings (which sometimes just takes time), we also recommend the ThunderShirt for Cats. The ThunderShirt for Cats applies a gentle constant pressure, like a hug, around a cat’s body- making them feel safer, calmer and more relaxed. For more information about the ThunderShirt for cats, visit www.ThunderWorks.com.

  • Singing for ThunderShirt by Special Guest, Sandy Robins

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    I have always been “blessed” with cats that sing in the car. But Ziggy out sings every cat I’ve ever known.

    When we took him home from the animal shelter, I put his vocals down to nerves.

    Not long after, we had to take him to the vet for his kitty shots. The moment we placed him in his carrier, the singing began.

    It started off with a tentative operatic dolcissimo (very sweet) “mew”. Followed by a second and then a third.  As we turned the corner he started scratching on the side of the carrier and the mew got more espressivo (insistent). Then he tried a new tactic and the mews got doloroso (sad and mournful).  From his perspective, he probably thought I wasn’t listening so he began to get more insistenta (insistent) until his vocals turned fortissimo (very loud).

    On the way home, it was a repeat performance. He wasn’t being naughty; he was really just stressed and anxious. Who knows what experiences he had an in a car before we adopted him.

    A few weeks later we were off to the vet again for follow-up shots. And soon Ziggy was singing the same aria. The next week, when it was time for his rabies shot courtesy of the animal shelter, we were back in the car and Ziggy was singing again.

    What was so interesting was the fact that it sounded like the same song.

    Cats in fact have quite a large vocabulary. Author and naturalist Jean Craighead George who writes about the language cats have in her award-winning book The Cats of Roxville Station and has studied cats in nature, says that the different ways in which a cat meows has a special idiosyncratic meaning. She has categorized some feline vocalizations as follows. They are written phonetically to emphasize the different sound and tones:

    In Kittens:

    • Mew (high pitched and thin) - a polite plea for help
    • MEW! (loud and frantic) - an urgent plea for help

    Adult cats:

    • Mew - plea for attention
    • Meow - emphatic plea for attention
    • MEOW! - a command!
    • Mee-o-ow (with falling cadence) - protest or whine
    • MEE-o-ow (shrill whine) - stronger protest
    • MYUP! (short, sharp, single note) - righteous indignation
    • MEOW! Meow! (repeated) - panicky call for help
    • Mier-r-r-ow (chirrup with lilting cadence) - friendly greeting

    Soon I worked out that Ziggy had composed a feline “song”:

    Here are his lyrics:

    Mew…mew…

    MEW!!

    Meow

    MEOW!

    Mee-o-ow

    MYUP! MYUP!

    MEE-o-ow

    MEE-o-ow

    Second verse same as the first.

    So I decided to translate. It goes something like this:

    Hello… Helloow …

    What’s happening here?

    This isn’t fair

    You scooped me out of my favorite chair

    I was a sleep

    What did you think --I wouldn’t make a peep?

    What’s happening now?

    Meeow miaow

    The vet!! Oh No!

    I don’t want to go

    I’m prodded and given a shot

    It calls for a total boycott

    Take me home….

    NOW!!!

    Meow….

    Finally I couldn’t take it anymore. There are always going to be vet visits for one reason or another. So I decided he was the perfect candidate for a feline ThunderShirt.

    I decided the best way to test the shirt was the take him one way to the vet without it and put it on for the journey home.

    I chose a fairly innocuous vet visit, namely, he was simply going for a Mani-Pedi. No needles or prodding involved. I even took Fudge along in the hope that seeing how she behaved would perhaps help him remain calm.

    No such luck. The outward-bound trip was typical – very vocal with Fudge simply staring at him in disbelief that a cat could make so much noise. So just before we popped him back in his carrier, I put him in a ThunderShirt. I reckoned he wasn’t going to have to walk around wearing it so he didn’t need to get used to it from that standpoint.

    On with the shirt, into the carrier and off we went home. It’s a 15-minute drive. And I must say Fudge and I enjoyed it immensely -- in total silence! I don’t say he enjoyed the ride, but he didn’t seem stressed and anxious to get out of the carrier, as was his typical modus operandi.

    I was amazed how it worked instantly. But apart from keeping him calm, it helped me to drive home fully concentrating on the road and not worrying about my feline passenger.

    When we got home, I took off the shirt and placed in his carrier, ready to go for next time.

     

    Sandy Robins  is an award-winning author and pet lifestyle expert.

    Follow her on Facebook here: http://www.Facebook.com/SandyRobinsPetLifestyleExpert

  • ThunderShirt works really well on this cool cat!

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    We love when ThunderShirt fans post fun videos of our products in action! This video that posted to YouTube.com last year has recently gone viral! In it, one “Scaredy cat” tries on his new ThunderShirt for the very first time, and immediately freezes, then flops. The cat’s owners try repeatedly to stand him back up, nearly a dozen times during the hilarious video, but the reaction is always the same- freeze, followed by flop.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QOcfS7xwVfY

    While this video is pretty entertaining, there is no need to worry. The ThunderShirt is not causing discomfort; cats are not used to being dressed and need time to adjust to feeling “swaddled” by the shirt.

    If you are just introducing your cat to the ThunderShirt, keep in mind that cats are amazingly sensitive to touch and sometimes require a little more adjustment time in the beginning. If a cat initially appears uncomfortable or does the “Freeze & Flop”, we recommend putting the ThunderShirt on your cat with a very light pressure for about 5-10 minutes so they can get used to it. Engaging your cat in play with their favorite toy or laser pointer is also a great way to get them moving and used to the ThunderShirt.

    Do you use ThunderShirt on your cat? We’d love to hear from you! Feel free to comment below or reach out to us via social media!

     

    Facebook: facebook.com/ThunderShirt

    Twitter: @ThunderShirt

    http://www.twitter.com/thundershirt

  • National Take Your Cat to the Vet Week

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    Many cat owners don't take their cats to the vet regularly because it can be such a difficult task, but it is important to keep you cats healthy and go for regular check ups.  Check out this cat's amazing transformation after using a Thundershirt to go to the vet and for the first time ever NOT having a difficult vet visit!  You can read the entire story here: http://conservationcubclub.com/2012/08/take-your-cat-to-the-vet-week-the-tiniest-tiger-visits-doctor/

    I hope this story encourages those of you that struggle getting your cats to the vet for their check-ups.  My parents had hopes that the Thundershirt for Cats would help me and it truly did.

    My doctors said that some parents had come in with dogs wearing Thundershirts and they too expressed success in keeping their canines calm.  I was the first feline to come in wearing the new Thundershirt for cats at my clinic.  The doctors are going to recommend  it to other cat parents to help relieve stress.

    I am proud that I could be a role model for my fellow felines so that more parents will be able to take their cats to the vet for regular check ups without so much anxiety and accidents.

  • Check out Thundershirt for Cats!

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    We introduced Thundershirt for Cats a couple months ago and it has been going great! We would love to share this new video with all of you! Hope you enjoy:)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PI5ak-7kh6Y

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